Analyze the Astro Pi Space Data in Your Web Browser

on April 27 | by

AstroPiHero2

Introduction

On December 9, 2015, two augmented Raspberry Pi single-board computers (aka the Astro Pis) were delivered to the International Space Station (ISS) via the Cygnus spacecraft. Part of British ESA Astronaut Tim Peake’s mission was to run experiments devised by the winners of the Astro Pi school-age student competition in the UK. The Raspberry Pis and Sense HATs used in these experiments would collect data over a period of time and deliver the results back to Earth for anyone to analyze. The data is back, and it is time to start analyzing.

Space Data

You can read the details about the data collected at https://www.raspberrypi.org/learning/astro-pi-flight-data-analysis/worksheet/. The purpose of this post is to give you another tool to do your analysis – a set of interactive data visualizations that run in your web browser. We took the CSV data collected from the ISS, uploaded it to Initial State’s tools, and shared each dataset publicly for anyone to use. The links to each dataset are at the bottom of this post.

How We Got The Data Into Initial State

Most people use Initial State to stream data from their devices directly into their Initial State account to create real-time dashboards, waveforms, etc. You can also bring data into Initial State’s data analytics tools through file uploads. The data delivered from the ISS is in CSV format, a supported file format. You can see how to upload files to your Initial State account at http://support.initialstate.com/knowledgebase/articles/803970-uploading-files.

To make the data a bit more organized, we broke apart the CSV files into individual day and week views in addition to the multi-week views.

Before You Get Started (Quick Tutorial)

Before you start diving into the data, you might want to take a couple of minutes and run through the “getting started” tutorials for each of the visualization/analytics tools that you will be using. This will help you get the most from these tools.

Waves – https://www.initialstate.com/#/waves
Lines – https://www.initialstate.com/#/lines
Tiles – No single tutorial but a bunch of small tutorials at http://support.initialstate.com/knowledgebase/topics/102613-tiles

What You Can Do

AstroTiles

You can use Tiles as a dashboard to see all of the data at once, each in a separate tile. The timeline feature in Tiles is useful here as it allows you to zoom into specific areas of time and see all of the data update at once. The compare feature is even more useful because it lets you overlap the data from two different periods of time onto each other. The data from Node 2, day 7 struck me as pretty interesting. The Yaw data is pretty cyclic but has some pretty distinct changes on this day in Node 2. You can see these changes using the compare option. The shape of the Yaw curve seems to be one of two shapes but cycling around the same frequency.

AstroWaves

Waves gives you a stacked row view of all data. This lets you quickly correlate different data streams to one another. There is a pretty big spike in Roll on Node 2 Day 7. If you zoom into both Roll and Yaw around this spike, you will see how Yaw is directly affected by this spike in Roll but recovers to its normal pattern when Roll settles back to its normal value.

AstroWaves2

Another nice feature of Waves is the ability to input data expressions to transform data in real-time. Let’s say you want to transform temp_p from Celsius to Fahrenheit then find the max value and its corresponding time in Fahrenheit on Day 7 of Node 2. You can do this in a matter of seconds by highlighting temp_p, (optionally) amplifying the signal using the ‘+’ key, typing =convert(c,f) in the Expression bar at the top toolbar, highlighting the newly created Fahrenheit signal, then typing =max in the Expression bar. For Day 7 of Node 2, the max temperature is 78.404 °F at 10:54 am (see GIF above).

AstroLines

Lines allows you to view line graphs with a shared y-axis. This is quite useful when trying to correlate the magnitude changes of two or more signals at any given instance of time. Lines gives you the ability to not only measure time differences with vertical cursors but also magnitude differences with horizontal cursors. In the GIF above, you can see how I quickly measured the differences in the mag_y and mag_z peaks (24.41).

Stop Rambling and Just Give Me The Data

ISS Columbus Location Data (Feb 16 – Feb 29)

Day 1 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 2 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 3 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 4 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 5 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 6 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 7 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 8 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 9 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 10 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 11 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 12 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 13 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 14 – Tiles Waves Lines
Week 1 – Tiles Waves Lines
Week 2 – Tiles Waves Lines
Complete (Feb 16 – Feb 29) – Tiles Waves Lines
Download all CSV files used to create the Columbus datasets

ISS Node 2 Location Data (Mar 9 – Mar 22)

Day 1 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 2 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 3 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 4 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 5 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 6 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 7 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 8 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 9 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 10 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 11 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 12 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 13 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 14 – Tiles Waves Lines
Week 1 – Tiles Waves Lines
Week 2 – Tiles Waves Lines
Complete (Mar 9 – Mar 22) – Tiles Waves Lines
Download all CSV files used to create the Node 2 datasets

ISS Columbus Location Data (Mar 14 – Apr 13)

Day 1 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 2 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 3 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 4 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 5 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 6 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 7 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 8 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 9 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 10 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 11 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 12 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 13 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 14 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 15 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 16 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 17 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 18 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 19 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 20 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 21 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 22 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 23 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 24 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 25 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 26 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 27 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 28 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 29 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 30 – Tiles Waves Lines
Day 31 – Tiles Waves Lines
Week 1 – Tiles Waves Lines
Week 2 – Tiles Waves Lines
Week 3 – Tiles Waves Lines
Week 4 – Tiles Waves Lines
Complete (Mar 14 – Apr 13) – Tiles Waves Lines
Download all CSV files used to create the Node 2 datasets

Did you discover anything interesting? Please share in the comments or by emailing me.

5 Responses

  1. […] Jamie Bailey from Initial State has been in contact. They have taken the data from Ed and Izzy, the two AstroPi units on the International Space Station, and imported it into their Internet of Things platform. They have made the entire graphing display available publicly so you can see what a vast amount of data has been collected. Read more and view the data/graphs here. […]

  2. Tony Abbey says:

    Well done Jamie – puts my home and boiler temperatures to shame! Initial State is doing a great job – I love the speed of update of your pages, compared with serving my own data locally from my Raspberry Pi. You must be using some pretty powerful cloud computing there.
    Tony

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